The Black Cat monthly round-up: January 2019

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Ella with her hurty paw.

The new year didn’t have the best of starts for poor Ella. She managed to split one of her nails down to the nail bed, which was very painful, and she had to have the nail removed under anaesthetic. She spent a few days with a bandaged paw, and she had to wear a plastic boot when out on (short) walks. She sounded like a small horse clopping around. In true spaniel style, she finished January with another injury – a snapped dewclaw. I’m hoping she’ll be more careful with her paws in February! The recent snow has certainly cheered her up.

What I’ve been working on

I managed to pack in a lot of work during January, and it couldn’t really have been more diverse. My first project was an account of the adventures of a community of dowsers – many of the events reported took place in warm and sunny climes, which was a nice antidote to the January weather. The second project was an elegantly structured novel about a young man who finds himself in big trouble with a local mob boss. My third and final January project will run into February – I’m proofreading a well-researched and interesting PhD thesis on the healthcare sector.

What I read for fun

I managed to pack in a lot of reading for fun as well – January was a long month. I started with Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo. I bought the absolutely stunning collector’s edition, and I’m glad I did. It’s fast-paced, moving and quite dark, with a welcome streak of humour.

I pre-ordered the The BBlack Cat Editorial Services_ January round-upinding by Bridget Collins some time ago, on the strength of the premise and the book’s aesthetic. It was released in early January (my copy actually turned up before the release date), and I was not disappointed. The cover is truly gorgeous  – I gasped when I peeked under the dust jacket. The story itself is beautifully written, powerful and engaging. The implications of the book’s core concept are quite terrifying.

I’d heard good things about Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman, and it lived up to the hype. It’s deeply sad, but there are passages that made me snort with laughter. I can’t remember the last time I read a book with such a strong narrator’s voice. Eleanor seems to me to be a truly unique character.

My final read of this month was Record of a Spaceborn Few by Becky Chambers. It seems strange, considering the heartbreaking things that happen in the Wayfarers books, that I should find the novels so comforting. I wasn’t sure I would like the style of this one – multiple stories, each from a different character’s perspective, eventually coming together to tell a bigger story – but I loved it. It worked brilliantly.

Looking ahead

The West Surrey and North Hampshire SfEP local group is meeting in mid-February for a tips and techniques session on professional practice. We’re going to look at how we interact with our clients, and the aim is to help each other improve and develop the strategies and tools we use. But what I’m really looking forward to is the bring-and-share lunch.

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The Black Cat monthly round-up: August 2018

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Partners in crime: Mini (left) and Ella (right).

We had a temporary addition at Black Cat HQ this month. The absolute sweetheart that is Mini came to stay while her dads were off on holiday. That meant a week of me having to corral three dogs, two cats, and a tortoise. The tortoise was the only one I could trust to behave. Fortunately, Mini is respectful of cats (Oscar sorted her out last time she came to stay) and she fits right in to our little pack. She and Ella spent a week chasing about and creating joyful chaos. We had a very mopey spaniel when it was time for Mini to go home.

What I’ve been working on

At first glance, August seems like a fairly quiet month, but my latest project has been something of a challenge. I started the month with a short story written by an independent author and returning client, whom I very much enjoy working with. The story explored the dark side of social media and its effect on mental health.

Black Cat Editorial Services_ August round-up(1)Then followed a proofread for a publishing house – this the memoir of a nurse, focusing on her time as a student nurse in the 1960s. Almost every page contained an attitude or event that made the 1960s seem like a different world to today.

The project I’m finishing off now, at the end of August, is a long and complex guide to complementary medicines and therapies. I’m going to deserve some sort of cake once I’ve finished it.

What I’ve read for fun

I’ve had a copy of The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet, by Becky Chambers, in my TBR pile for a long time. I had a gem just sitting there, waiting to be read. It’s beautiful and engrossing and different, and the characters are all of those things too. It’s brilliant. I’ve bought the sequel and it will probably be one of my September reads.

I have to make a confession now: when I read The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy this month, it was for the first time. I mean, I’ve seen the 2005 film version, so I was sort of aware of the story, but I hadn’t read the book, or listened to the original radio series. Anyway, I finally read the book, and it was everything I expected it to be: sharp, funny, surprising. And Marvin was still my favourite character.

My reads this month were concluded with Rotherweird by Andrew Caldecott. Here’s another confession: I bought Rotherweird because it had sprayed edges (black) and I’m a sucker for sprayed edges. It’s the same reason I bought The Watchmaker of Filigree Street (green edges), and that turned out to be one of my favourite books. The sprayed-edge method of choosing has not let me down. I loved Rotherweird. It is weird. It’s dark and fantastical, with a sprawling cast and twisting plot. I physically flinched at a certain event, which I did not see coming, near the end. The sequel is on my wish list.

Looking ahead

September is shaping up to be a busy month. The big event will be the Society for Editors and Proofreaders’ conference, this year in Lancaster. It will be my first time attending a conference – for anything, ever. I don’t feel particularly nervous yet – but I expect it to hit me once I start packing. Later in the month I’ll be hosting a lunch meeting for the West Surrey and North Hampshire local group; it’s been quite a while since our last meeting and I think there will be lots for us to catch up on.

Around my SfEP-related activities, I’ll be celebrating my birthday. I seem to be making the most of it this year – I have an afternoon tea booked in, and a trip to Berkshire Show planned, as well as dinner with family.

All this excitement may mean that it takes me a bit longer than usual to reply to emails.