The Black Cat monthly round-up: August 2021

I had my second dose COVID vaccination in the early part of August. Like with the first dose, I had a very sore arm for a couple of days, but I’ve been quite fortunate in that that’s the only side effect I have experienced. It’s comforting to know I have the protection of two jabs, and so do all of my close friends and family.

What I’ve been working on

August has been a ridiculously busy month. I finished the copy-edit of the psychological thriller I was working on in July, and I moved on to the copy-edit of the author’s next novel, which is a longer, more disturbing, tale. I have finished the copy-edit of the last instalment of an epic fantasy fiction series, and I am very sad to say goodbye to the characters I’ve spent so much time with. I’m also sad that my collaboration with the author has come to an end – it has been a wonderful experience. July’s critique was also finished off, and I have a new one that I will focus on at the beginning of September.

I’ve had three proofreads on my plate – one a modern exploration of the personalities of Greek gods, one a murder-mystery, and one a collection of short stories. The first two are done, and the third will be finished by early September.

What I read for fun

There has been no reading for fun. I chose sleep instead. Please see the section above for my excuses.

Ghost hunting

A sub-heading I never thought I’d use, but here we are. Oxford Castle and Prison is not huge, but the history is impressive (and horrifying and deeply sad, as with most places of historical interest). It was an interesting evening, if very tiring (I am not made to stay up past midnight and the event lasted until 3am). I cannot report any significant breakthroughs in providing evidence of contact from the other side, but there were a few motion detectors set off, some unexplained footsteps and knocking sounds, and some bits and pieces caught via spirit box. Others had whole conversations via the Ouija board, but it doesn’t seem that I have any sensitivity to these things. It hasn’t changed my naturally sceptical outlook, but it was mostly good fun. I am disappointed but not surprised to report that COVID precautions meant that snacks were not provided, but my friend brought his home-made brownies and they kept us going. I may also have had a cheeseburger on the way home – it was a little like being a student again.

Looking ahead

It’s my birthday in September, so I am looking forward to some time off to enjoy it. I will be attending the CIEP conference, which takes place online this year and runs from Saturday 11 September to Tuesday 14 September. There are some great speakers lined up and I am looking forward to absorbing their kindly shared knowledge.

The Black Cat monthly round-up: August 2020

I took a week or so off in August, and it was nice to have a break – I needed a few days to relax. I had my friend’s dog, Mini, for a while, and she went on some adventures with Ella, my spaniel. Ella seemed pleased to have a friend to hang out with, but the house is now back to being very quiet. In other news, I had to invest in an air conditioning unit to get me through the latest heatwave. I find it impossible to concentrate in the intense heat. Now I have to find storage space for it until I need it again next year…

What I’ve been working on

August saw the return of some of my regular publishing work, but not paper proofreads. I miss them, actually. Working on a screen all day is hard on the eyes, and I like the simplicity of BSI marks. But things change. My break means that I had only one competed project this month: the copy-edit of a memoir. I’m still working on the copy-edit of a YA fantasy epic that I had previously critiqued – it is really rewarding to see my advice turned into so much improvement. I’m also working on a critique of a novel set in Europe during the 11th century.

Professional development

I do a formal training course every year as part of my continuing professional development. I find myself picking up more and more potential copyright issues lately, and I thought it would be useful to take the Chartered Institute of Editing and Proofreading’s course Copyright for Editorial Professionals. I don’t plan on clearing permissions myself, but it is good to have some knowledge of how to assess and deal with copyright issues.

What I’ve been reading

I finished Queenie and The Black Hawks, both of which I’d started reading in July. They are very, very different novels, but both worth reading. I pre-ordered Matt Haig’s latest novel, The Midnight Library, and I’m very glad I did. I loved it. It’s a beautiful book and a beacon of hope in the quite often dark period we find ourselves living through.

Looking ahead

I hope to organise a Zoom meeting for my CIEP local group; we are due a catch-up. And I’ll be taking a few more days off – my birthday approaches and I’ll have cake to eat.

The Black Cat monthly round-up: August 2019

Black Cat Editorial Services_ August round-up(1)One of the best things I did during August was to take part in FutureLearn’s How to Read a Novel course. It’s a great introductory exploration of key parts of modern fiction: plot, characterisation, dialogue and setting. The concepts were familiar to me but Dr Alex Lawrie is a wonderful guide through the frameworks and examples presented in the course. Fiction writers, and editors, could do worse than spend a few hours working through the material and thinking about how to apply it to their own practice.

What I’ve been working on

I’ve been fortunate to have four books on my desk this month. I started with a children’s fantasy-fiction novel, set in Scotland, and followed it with a novel about a European woman starting a new life in India. Finishing off the last two books will take me into September. One is a fascinating non-fiction book about cricket in the early twentieth century; the other is a fiction novel about bereavement.

What I read for fun

I read two brilliant books in August. The Way of All Flesh, by Ambrose Parry, is a Edinburgh-set historical crime novel. I was drawn right in. It’s a good example of how to use two point-of-view characters to cover the same events, of how to use their overlapping perspectives to enhance the reader’s engagement with the story. Children of Blood and Bone, by Tomi Adeyemi, is another strong example of using multiple point-of-view characters. It’s glorious, epic fantasy-fiction, with superb world-building and female friendship at its core. I do wish, however, that the characters didn’t exclaim ‘Agh!’ or ‘Ugh!’ quite so often.

Looking ahead

This time last year I was nervously looking forward to attending the Society for Proofreaders and Editors’ conference. I’m not making the journey this year but I’ll be following the Twitter hashtag (#sfep2019) to keep up with the goings-on. I will be taking part in September’s meeting of the West Surrey and North Hampshire local group. We’ll be talking about marketing and finding work (always a hot topic for freelancers). Then I will be off on a short holiday to celebrate my birthday.

The Black Cat monthly round-up: August 2018

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Partners in crime: Mini (left) and Ella (right).

We had a temporary addition at Black Cat HQ this month. The absolute sweetheart that is Mini came to stay while her dads were off on holiday. That meant a week of me having to corral three dogs, two cats, and a tortoise. The tortoise was the only one I could trust to behave. Fortunately, Mini is respectful of cats (Oscar sorted her out last time she came to stay) and she fits right in to our little pack. She and Ella spent a week chasing about and creating joyful chaos. We had a very mopey spaniel when it was time for Mini to go home.

What I’ve been working on

At first glance, August seems like a fairly quiet month, but my latest project has been something of a challenge. I started the month with a short story written by an independent author and returning client, whom I very much enjoy working with. The story explored the dark side of social media and its effect on mental health.

Black Cat Editorial Services_ August round-up(1)Then followed a proofread for a publishing house – this the memoir of a nurse, focusing on her time as a student nurse in the 1960s. Almost every page contained an attitude or event that made the 1960s seem like a different world to today.

The project I’m finishing off now, at the end of August, is a long and complex guide to complementary medicines and therapies. I’m going to deserve some sort of cake once I’ve finished it.

What I’ve read for fun

I’ve had a copy of The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet, by Becky Chambers, in my TBR pile for a long time. I had a gem just sitting there, waiting to be read. It’s beautiful and engrossing and different, and the characters are all of those things too. It’s brilliant. I’ve bought the sequel and it will probably be one of my September reads.

I have to make a confession now: when I read The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy this month, it was for the first time. I mean, I’ve seen the 2005 film version, so I was sort of aware of the story, but I hadn’t read the book, or listened to the original radio series. Anyway, I finally read the book, and it was everything I expected it to be: sharp, funny, surprising. And Marvin was still my favourite character.

My reads this month were concluded with Rotherweird by Andrew Caldecott. Here’s another confession: I bought Rotherweird because it had sprayed edges (black) and I’m a sucker for sprayed edges. It’s the same reason I bought The Watchmaker of Filigree Street (green edges), and that turned out to be one of my favourite books. The sprayed-edge method of choosing has not let me down. I loved Rotherweird. It is weird. It’s dark and fantastical, with a sprawling cast and twisting plot. I physically flinched at a certain event, which I did not see coming, near the end. The sequel is on my wish list.

Looking ahead

September is shaping up to be a busy month. The big event will be the Society for Editors and Proofreaders’ conference, this year in Lancaster. It will be my first time attending a conference – for anything, ever. I don’t feel particularly nervous yet – but I expect it to hit me once I start packing. Later in the month I’ll be hosting a lunch meeting for the West Surrey and North Hampshire local group; it’s been quite a while since our last meeting and I think there will be lots for us to catch up on.

Around my SfEP-related activities, I’ll be celebrating my birthday. I seem to be making the most of it this year – I have an afternoon tea booked in, and a trip to Berkshire Show planned, as well as dinner with family.

All this excitement may mean that it takes me a bit longer than usual to reply to emails.